WHY

(COW)

SHIT

MATTERS

STUDIO

COVID LOCKDOWN STUDIO

'We want to be free to do what we want to do, we want to get loaded, we want to have a good time, that's what we are going to do, we are going to have a good time.' 

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

ITERATIVE DEISGN 

Drawing inspiration from surrounding agricultural structures, specifically local dutch barns, the guiding spatial principle behind the design process was to propose an alternative dutch barn typology built from local and readily available organic waste.

DUTCH

BARN

TYPOLOGY

Dutch Barns are agricultural buildings primarily used to store hay. The structures have a roof but no wall and are typically built from with a steel frame and clad corrugated metal. Rather than using steel (high embodied carbon), could these structures be built from locally available organic waste?

TIME FOR A CHANGE?

ESTABLISHING A PROGRAM 

DRAWING

THROUGH

ITERATIONS

MASSING

MODELS

MASTERPLAN

DEVELOPMENT

CLUSTERING

LOCAL FARMS

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Masterplan
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WORKING

IN SECTION

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South Elevation
South Elevation

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THINKING

IN 3D

A LOCALISED

SINGLE FARM 

SYSTEM?

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GF Plan
GF Plan

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REVIEW:

MAY 14TH

REVIEW:

MAY 29TH

KEY REFERENCES

CAT

WALES

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MUSEO DELLA MERDA

MILAN

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H.G MATTEWS

CHESHIRE

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RWANDA CRICK STADIUM

RWANDA

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MAYA SOMIYA LIBRARY

INDIA

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01
01

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HOOKE PARK

DORSET

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SHATWELL FARM

SOMERSET

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HERE EAST

LONDON

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LEARNING AGREEMENT

'MY WORK ALWAYS STARTS WITH A MATERIAL, AND THEN THE CREATIVE PROCESS IS SHAPED AROUND THIS HANDS ON INVESTIGATION'

‘The practice of architecture and the role of the architect must expand if the profession is going to be capable of dealing with the contemporary societal flux.’  This learning agreement is a self-reflection on my experience within the umbrella of ‘architecture’ thus far, as a means to speculate how I would like to shape my spatial practice moving forward.

What kind of architect do you want to be? A question that I am frequently asked when I tell people that I am studying architecture.  As it happens, l do not have a clear answer as of yet, which I think is a good thing. However, there are a couple of notions that I am sure will not play a dominant role in my future practice.  Perhaps the most pressing being the dominance of the artificial image, the notion that ‘the problem is the picture’.  This was particularly evident during my BA, which I felt gave a high reward to the production of final images, and somewhat overlooked process-driven work.  I feel this creates a disconnection between myself as the designer and social experience of the people occupying a space.  Whilst I do recognise the importance of image as an engaging representational tool, I would argue that there is an over-reliance on aesthetics within both architectural education and practice.

One notion that I intend to embrace moving forward is the practice of broadening my creative landscape through collaboration.  The importance of absorbing social, environmental, and cultural information can only enrich my outlook of a spatial practitioner. 

 

For me, the design process always starts with a material, and then creative narrative is shaped around this hands this investigation.  We are living in an unsettled time, but also within a society that I believe will embrace change.  I believe that the material world around us is going to change significantly over the coming years.  In many ways, we’re still living out the material dreams and needs of our ancestors, which much of the lifestyle that we’re accustomed to today standing as a product of past inventions.  I am driven by the concept of introducing low impact, regenerative materials back into the forefront of the built environment. 

Simply put, I work best when I am stimulated and interested in what I am doing.  Looking forward, this has to be the key guiding principle that underpins my practice.  

COMMUNITY

OF PRACTICE